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“OpenStack is on the cusp of major adoption.”  How many times have you heard a vendor or analyst say that or some variation of it in the past 12 months?
Yesterday was day two of the ZeroVM Design Summit. Day one mostly focused on the architecture and capabilities of ZeroVM itself; while day two examined integration with other technologies, particularly OpenStack Swift (the technology behind Rackspace Cloud Files).
A couple months ago we acquired the team behind ZeroVM, the lightweight open source application hypervisor. At that time we promised that more was coming soon – and now we have started to say what some of the plans are for this new technology.
We’re three and a half years into OpenStack® and there is still confusion about exactly what OpenStack is, how to compare OpenStack to other cloud platforms, and specific use cases for OpenStack. I find myself having the same conversations over and over again in an attempt to debunk the myths and misperceptions in the market. There are a number of them, but to help people who are still getting up to speed with OpenStack, let’s focus in on the three largest.
Developers have been buzzing lately about how virtualization containers can boost scale while lowering costs. We are big fans of containers and the ways that they simplify the deployment and management of cloud applications. We think the next step is containerizing and virtualizing the application, not just the machine.
There are a lot of good reasons to be excited about containers, a form of operating system-level virtualization with many applications. At Mailgun, we’re excited about containers for four major reasons:
Virtual machines dominate the datacenter and are the basis for a ton of heavy lifting in compute. But there’s growing interest among demanding technology companies in containers, a form of operating system-level virtualization.
This is a guest post written and contributed by David Strauss, CTO at Pantheon, a Rackspace partner and all-in-one Drupal platform provider.
I’ve spent a lot of time lately trying to help people understand that hybrid cloud is like happiness – it isn’t something you can buy.
VMworld 2013 was an enormous success for VMware. It attracted 22,500 attendees from all over the world. Its sheer magnitude cements VMworld’s spot among the biggest enterprise IT infrastructure conferences. In my view it is THE EVENT OF THE YEAR for anyone involved in IT operations, whether they are a technology provider, a service provider or an SI partner.
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