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By Craig Dalton, Senior Vice President of Customer Success at Troux Technologies
For the last several weeks I’ve been explaining the setup of my home Rackspace Private Cloud and OpenStack lab. From the basic hardware configuration and adding compute nodes to adding high availability and using Neutron networking.
More companies are turning towards a blended infrastructure to power their applications and to take advantage of cost savings, flexibility and security. That’s why Rackspace offers a true hybrid cloud portfolio: a mix of dedicated hardware, public cloud and the Rackspace Private Cloud.
Adding Extra Compute Nodes to Rackspace Private Cloud
So after following the first three posts, we now have a Rackspace Private Cloud powered by OpenStack running with two Controllers (HA) and three Computes. So now what? Well the first thing we need to do is get our hands dirty with the OpenStack Networking component, Neutron, and create a network that our instances can be spun up on. For the home lab, I have dumb unmanaged switches – and I take advantage of that by creating a Flat Network that allows my instances access out through my home LAN on the 192.168.1.0/24 subnet.
In the first two posts I covered the basics: what hardware is involved and the basic network services that form the basis of my Rackspace Private Cloud install. In this post, I set up Rackspace Private Cloud to give an OpenStack environment consisting of highly available Controllers running as a pair with services such as the OpenStack APIs, Neutron, Glance and Keystone and three compute servers allowing me flexibility to do some testing.
Self-service clouds have changed the way enterprises consume IT services. Corporations, public sector organizations and departments can now easily initiate a relationship with an outside service provider to take advantage of all of the benefits of the cloud (e.g. on-demand self-services, utility-billing, rapid deployment, instantaneous scalability, etc.). When these shadow IT environments are created, however, central IT is often not notified or involved in the process. This makes it difficult for businesses to ensure that security, governance and IT spend are well managed across the organization.
EDITOR’S NOTE: You can now watch video of the full webinar here.
In the first part of this series, I introduced the kit that makes up my home lab. There’s nothing unusual or special in the kit list, but it certainly is affordable and makes entry into an OpenStack world very accessible.
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