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By Ryan Bonifacino, Vice President of Digital Strategy, Alex and Ani
What a difference a year makes! We published the first mobile ecommerce infographic last year. Since then, all the stats suggest that mobile has continued its meteoric rise as an ecommerce powerhouse.
Content has always been king on the web, but there has been a dramatic shift in how it rules. Enterprises have moved beyond the simple content management systems (CMS) of yesteryear in favor of adopting robust services to manage the end-to-end visitor experience. These businesses have deeper needs than just scheduling and publishing content. Enterprises now require sophisticated systems with the ability to deliver information to a unique user persona, tailored by geography and presented with consistency across an array of devices.
The bulk of our screen time is shifting to mobile devices. It’s gone from laptops and desktops to smartphones and tablets. In the midst of this change, companies need to consider the differences in developing for on-the-go devices as opposed to those used at a desk.
By Suraj Sanchit, Creative Director, Gracious Studios
For years, marketers have been writing obituaries for the “purchase funnel,” that cone-shaped path that customers traverse before clicking “Buy.” But reports of the funnel’s death may have been greatly exaggerated.
IRCE is one of the largest ecommerce events in the world, and 2014 looks like it will prove to be bigger than ever. IRCE is celebrating 10 years of bringing digital retailers together, and Rackspace will be representing in style.
Open source Content Management Systems (CMS) like WordPress, Drupal and Joomla! have now been around for a decade or so, doing their part to make the internet a more manageable place. At its core, a CMS structures the experience of developing, managing and consuming a website. Chances are good that a big chunk of the content you’ll read on the web today (including this post) is being delivered through an open source CMS. FedEx and The Washington Post are using Drupal. Coca-Cola France and Sony Music are using WordPress. Harvard and IHOP use Joomla!
Many companies that came to prominence in the age of the internet understand that their brands exists both on and offline. However, more traditional brick and mortar companies—those that sold goods when a shopping cart was something you physically pushed in a store— may find themselves struggling with creating their online brand. Here are three considerations for those companies as they look to ramp up their online presence.
By Jason Perry, President & CEO, Engagency
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