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For the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) our awards season is where we shine. The camera flashes, the glitz, the glamour, the red carpet. And film and television lovers across the UK flood to our site to see who’s nominated, who won and to get more details on the awards. Our websites need to perform their best to accommodate these traffic spikes.
It wasn’t too long ago that developers and database administrators answered with a simple “no, thank you” when asked about implementing any database on virtualized or cloud environments. The state of database-as-a-service solutions has come a long way in a relatively short period of time. Today, the number of choices available to developers in the data services tier has exploded.
Amid all of the buzz around cloud technology, it is critical for IT organizations to understand the economic aspects of this technology beyond differences between CapEx and OpEx that have been discussed ad nauseam.
I’ve spent a lot of time lately trying to help people understand that hybrid cloud is like happiness – it isn’t something you can buy.
As a Solutions Architect within Rackspace’s Big Cloud team, I have the good fortune of working with both private cloud and public cloud customers. I often see businesses adopt hybrid cloud strategies, whereby services consumed span both these platforms. Deciding where to put different workloads ultimately begs the question: how do public and private cloud platforms stack up against each other from a performance perspective?
We’ve been hearing a lot lately from customers who are frustrated by the limitations of one-size-fits all clouds, whether they’re based on public cloud or private cloud or bare metal servers. These customers want each of their workloads to run where it runs best and most cost-effectively. And that’s what we at Rackspace work to deliver to them, through our hybrid cloud.
Academic and scientific research often involves the construction of mathematical and numerical models to solve scientific and engineering problems. Traditionally, these complex and intensive computational models have been implemented on super computers or high-performance computing (HPC) infrastructure.  These models are difficult to setup and operate, and can create a painful experience for researchers who often have to wait in a long line to use their university’s super computing infrastructure, whether it’s for a few hours or a few days.
Lots of companies out there will come out and sell you software, hardware or both to help you build a private cloud. It’s our opinion at Rackspace and the opinion of thousands of customers using our cloud solutions every day that OpenStack, by far, represents the best software for building a cloud. Our public cloud is powered by OpenStack and our private clouds are built using our freely available Rackspace Private Cloud Software. We use reliable and tested hardware in our data centers and help our customers architect and implement the same reliable, high performance hardware in their own data centers.
If you’re not quite sure exactly what OpenStack is; you’re not alone. We’re frequently asked what OpenStack is and why we think it’s better than anything else out there.
In every conversation I have with enterprise cloud customers they use the words public, private and hybrid to describe the projects or phases of projects they’re considering. It’s fantastic that people are finally thinking about how they will use the different types of resources available. But this mindset of “many clouds” in your enterprise is flawed. I’m not the first person by a long shot to say this, but it bears repeating because most enterprises aren’t listening.
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