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Last week, OSCON brought together people in the open source community from around the world. While attendees heard experts talk about their respective languages and projects, I noticed several overall trends that emerged throughout the conference.
Our culture is obsessed with perfection. We have endless debates about it: the perfect movie, the perfect job, the perfect car, the perfect guitar riff. We seek out the best restaurants and order the best entrée. And who isn’t inspired to be the best by the song played during the All-Valley Karate Championships montage in The Karate Kid?
One of the most powerful features of the cloud is that developers and operations engineers can treat infrastructure as code. Instead of calling a provider requesting to bring a new server online, or asking for it to be removed, people can now write their application to toolkits that can control their entire configuration. Using a Multi-Cloud Toolkit makes this even easier – it allows you to control infrastructure on a variety of clouds in your native programming language, while reducing the amount of time you have to spend learning how to communicate with different cloud APIs.
As OSCON, a global conference on open source software, got underway in Portland this week, the timing of the recent J.K. Rowling unmasking couldn’t have been better. As my colleague and co-author, Garrett Heath, tweeted from the conference, “Accio Open Source!” For the three people left on the planet who haven’t read a Harry Potter book, that’s a common summoning charm used among Rowling’s fictional wizards.
Building apps for the hybrid cloud is different than building apps to run purely on dedicated gear. This is why my team and I created the Five Pillars of Cloudiness at Rackspace, and I was happy to present them at the Unlocked session this week at OSCON in Portland. Here is a summary of the talk, and you can also check out previous posts on both the DevOps blog and the Rackspace blog for more detailed information on each pillar.
At the Unlocked session at OSCON this week, I presented how DevOps is key to help power applications on the hybrid cloud. One of the hardest things about DevOps is defining what it is; several people had differing definitions in our session. I feel that DevOps brings together a culture and work methodology for both developers and operations engineers/admins to work on a common goal.
Last week we wrapped the second stop of Unlocked: The Hybrid Cloud in beautiful London, and I want to give you quick recap on the event.
We will be at the O’Reilly OSCON Open Source Convention 2009 in San Jose, California this week, July 20-24th, at the San Jose Convention Center. In it’s 11th year, OSCON is bringing together “over 3,000 experts, visionaries, and hackers in the trenches to explore all that open source has to offer.”
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