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When we started OpenStack, the goal was to form a community of like-minded companies and contributors to push for an open alternative to proprietary cloud software. We saw open source as a platform to foster swift innovation and to give customers more choice.
By Giacomo Orizzonte, Head of Production, TeamSourcing
In the first two posts I covered the basics: what hardware is involved and the basic network services that form the basis of my Rackspace Private Cloud install. In this post, I set up Rackspace Private Cloud to give an OpenStack environment consisting of highly available Controllers running as a pair with services such as the OpenStack APIs, Neutron, Glance and Keystone and three compute servers allowing me flexibility to do some testing.
Every year, hundreds of developers, users and administrators of OpenStack apply to speak at the annual OpenStack Summit, which takes place May 12 through May 16 this year in Atlanta.
EDITOR’S NOTE: You can now watch video of the full webinar here.
Introduction I am frequently asked by analysts, users, the media and even other vendors about the production readiness of OpenStack, to which I affirm in the positive. There are also often questions about the differences between the various OpenStack distributions and offerings. I answer whenever possible by drawing the distinction between OpenStack as the open source project and as the products and services available to help make it a production-ready cloud platform. If you are unclear about the difference between an open source project and a product, I hope this blog post serves as a useful primer. I will highlight the concept of OpenStack as a service offering (yes, Cloud-as-a Service is a thing) to the concepts of project and product, using our Rackspace Private Cloud (RPC) as the canonical example for both a product and a service. To help illustrate the distinctions, I will discuss the differences between the three offerings by examining three categories:
In the first part of this series, I introduced the kit that makes up my home lab. There’s nothing unusual or special in the kit list, but it certainly is affordable and makes entry into an OpenStack world very accessible.
EDITOR’S NOTE: Ken Hui will be joining John Griffith, OpenStack Program Technical Lead for the Cinder Project and Solutions Architect at SolidFire for a webinar Tuesday, April 29 at 11:00 a.m. CDT to talk about OpenStack Block Storage Design Considerations including an interactive panel discussion at the end. Please join John and I by registering at: https://t.co/CRSEOkM5sD.
Last weekend, a group of Harvard Women in Computer Science students put on an amazing technical women’s conference called WECode (WE = Women Engineers).
Over the past year I’ve been using a home lab for quick, hands-on testing of OpenStack and Rackspace Private Cloud, and a number of people have requested information on the setup. Throughout the next few blog posts I will explain what I’ve got. This serves two purposes: 1) documentation of my own setup as well as 2) hopefully providing information that other people find useful – and not everything is about OpenStack.
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