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Rackspace Cloud Queues is backed by the open source project, Marconi.  Below, Oz Akan,  Development Manager for Rackspace Cloud Queues and an active contributor to Marconi, walks us through the project. Want to try out Marconi without managing your own environment?  Want to explore open source code with the comfort of Fanatical Support behind you? Rackspace Cloud Queues is currently accepting Early Access participants.  Sign up here.  
Coming from, say, an enterprise-level Microsoft .NET shop and crossing over into the world of open source is like stepping out of an office building into the street during a parade. Clowns and bands and floats roll by as you tighten up your necktie and try to remain distinguished. But you know you really want to join the folks pulling the giant Batman float.
The concept of open source has allowed software development to evolve in very different ways than many other industries. It’s common practice for even the largest tech companies to regularly rely on open source software – even Google relies heavily on open source to keep running by using languages like Python to libraries like OpenSSL and OpenSSH.
With OpenStack, we already have the open source software to run your data center. Now, we’re building the open source hardware to run it on. The Open Compute Project is a collaborative community of designers, consumers and innovators focused on building more efficient servers, storage and data center hardware designs for scalable computing at a lower cost.
Earlier this year Racker Anne Gentle blogged about her contributions to the OpenStack Operations Guide, an instructional book highlighting how to operate the cloud on a daily basis. Fueled by caffeine and take-out food, Anne and a dream team of cloud evangelists and developers outlined, wrote and edited the 230-page book in just five days at the Rackspace Austin office.
Last week, OSCON brought together people in the open source community from around the world. While attendees heard experts talk about their respective languages and projects, I noticed several overall trends that emerged throughout the conference.
Our culture is obsessed with perfection. We have endless debates about it: the perfect movie, the perfect job, the perfect car, the perfect guitar riff. We seek out the best restaurants and order the best entrée. And who isn’t inspired to be the best by the song played during the All-Valley Karate Championships montage in The Karate Kid?
One of the most powerful features of the cloud is that developers and operations engineers can treat infrastructure as code. Instead of calling a provider requesting to bring a new server online, or asking for it to be removed, people can now write their application to toolkits that can control their entire configuration. Using a Multi-Cloud Toolkit makes this even easier – it allows you to control infrastructure on a variety of clouds in your native programming language, while reducing the amount of time you have to spend learning how to communicate with different cloud APIs.
As OSCON, a global conference on open source software, got underway in Portland this week, the timing of the recent J.K. Rowling unmasking couldn’t have been better. As my colleague and co-author, Garrett Heath, tweeted from the conference, “Accio Open Source!” For the three people left on the planet who haven’t read a Harry Potter book, that’s a common summoning charm used among Rowling’s fictional wizards.
OpenStack is no longer a toddler. Today, it’s three years old. And like all preschoolers, it’s making amazing strides and having an occasional fall. But it is absolutely something that all of us who helped birth are amazingly proud of! It has grown into a project the scope of which is beyond anything we saw coming three years go.
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