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For anyone tasked with developing an IT disaster recovery (DR) plan, the alphabet soup of DR options talked about today by service providers, software vendors, analysts and pundits can be truly bewildering. Against this backdrop, analysts like Gartner predict dramatic growth in both the consumption and hype of “cloudwashed” DR services.  For example, John Morency of Gartner claims,  ”RaaS has been hailed as a ‘killer’ cloud app for disaster recovery, but the reality is that there has been much hype and some truth.”
The focus of any IT company should be on innovation, not disaster recovery. Budget and resources should align with your business objectives, and when possible, non-revenue generating tasks should be outsourced.
New technologies bring new challenges. When your data is critical to the daily operations of your organization, unexpected downtime can cost your business big dollars.
An Aberdeen Group survey in 2012 found that the industry average cost of downtime is $181,770 per hour [1]. It’s an issue we’ll talk about in depth at EMC World.
Any company, large or small, that’s running business-critical applications must have a disaster recovery (DR) strategy that includes geographic redundancy. You need to have the ability to spin up certain virtual machines (VMs) and restart the important apps in the event of a data center outage or unplanned downtime.
Whether you use the Cloud or dedicated servers, you should always make sure you have a plan for your configuration in the event that something goes wrong. This is a series of posts based on a discussion I had with Aaron Scheel, a solutions engineer here at Rackspace.  
Whether you use the Cloud or dedicated servers, you should always make sure you have a plan for your configuration in the event that something goes wrong. This is a series of posts based on a discussion I had with Aaron Scheel, a solutions engineer here at Rackspace. 
Whether you use the cloud or dedicated servers, you should always make sure you have a plan for your configuration in the event that something goes wrong. This is the first in a series of posts based on a discussion I had with Aaron Scheel, a solutions engineer here at Rackspace.
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