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For those of you who don’t know, Trove is the newest integrated OpenStack project. We have been working on it for over two years at Rackspace, and it’s been a wild ride. We’ve had a ton of help from our friends at HP, who have been on this roller coaster with us for a long while as well. You’re sure to hear more about Trove at OpenStack Summit Atlanta next week, but today I’d like to take a walk down memory lane with Trove, and talk about how it went from a small project started within Rackspace to the treasure it is today.
In yesterday’s post I considered some of the limitations of running MongoDB on the public cloud. In the event that you decide to host MongoDB with a cloud provider, below are some thoughts on how to choose the right one. The framework is actually applicable to many other data services, but we will continue to use MongoDB for the discussion.
It wasn’t too long ago that developers and database administrators answered with a simple “no, thank you” when asked about implementing any database on virtualized or cloud environments. The state of database-as-a-service solutions has come a long way in a relatively short period of time. Today, the number of choices available to developers in the data services tier has exploded.
Developers want to spend time focusing on new features rather than managing their databases. This reinforces the importance of database-as-a-service (DBaaS). This is why today we’re fortifying our technology partnership with Cloudant through a strategic investment.
ObjectRocket, the industrial strength MongoDB database-as-a-service company that we acquired in February, is now available in our Chicago data center. This means you can now use ObjectRocket as part of your Rackspace deployments.
This morning, we announced the acquisition of ObjectRocket.
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