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With a growing number of OpenStack projects, how do you define what is the minimum set of OpenStack features that should be enabled?
This weekend, 140 Rackers will be heading out to the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. We’ll be participating in many different sessions about many different topics.
EDITOR’S NOTE: Scalability and security sound complex. In this two-part blog series, we seek to eliminate some of the confusion by digging deeper into how users can grow a configuration without compromising the integrity of your app’s security.
EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the first post in a two-part series on scalability and security in the Managed Cloud. Check back tomorrow for part two.
The term “cloud” has been contorted so many ways that it’s hard to tell what it means any more. This is especially true for an emerging business as there is often neither the time nor the budget to properly invest in IT research and cloud is regularly seen simply as the cheap alternative to a dedicated hosting solution. While it’s true that cloud is generally cheaper than a dedicated solution, it is important to understand that the switch to cloud cannot be a one-for-one transition. Cloud is fundamentally a different hosting paradigm and must be approached accordingly.
In a recent guest post entitled “Performance at Scale: SSDs, Silver Bullets and Serialization” for High Scalability, Aaron Sullivan, a Principal Engineer at Rackspace, took a close look at the problem of trying to increase performance across software and hardware systems. Let’s say that you want to increase the performance of your application by 10X. That turns out to be monumentally difficult and requires a comprehensive fine-tuning of all the components that contribute to performance.
In the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region, companies are hungry for speed and reliability. We frequently hear it from our customers: improved speed and reliability set their businesses apart from their competitors. Swift application performance equips companies to win.
Performance issues are at the heart of why many apps don’t meet user expectations and die a slow death. While the user might see a single application, on the backend there are many moving parts that must align in order to deliver a consistent experience.
Underperforming servers and failure in the cloud can lead to overly complicated architectures, server sprawl and operational nightmares. When that happens, your architects end up spending precious development time compensating for cloud deficiency rather than building the next killer app.
By Roland Schmidt, Senior Director of Business Development, Clustrix, Inc.
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