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When Open Compute Foundation’s COO Cole Crawford gave a presentation at the OpenStack Summit in San Diego six months ago, he asked how many people in the audience had heard of his project. Only three hands went up. Fast forward, six months later, in Portland, he asked the same question and most people raised their hands. Like OpenStack itself, Open Compute is gaining interest.
Academic and scientific research often involves the construction of mathematical and numerical models to solve scientific and engineering problems. Traditionally, these complex and intensive computational models have been implemented on super computers or high-performance computing (HPC) infrastructure.  These models are difficult to setup and operate, and can create a painful experience for researchers who often have to wait in a long line to use their university’s super computing infrastructure, whether it’s for a few hours or a few days.
One device getting a lot of buzz at SXSW Interactive is the Leap Motion Controller, which allows you to control your computer with hand motions in mid-air. We first caught sight of the controller over the weekend at Drone Games, when one team used it to control their quadcopter drone with up, down and tilting hand motions. Today we ventured over to Leap’s demo tent near the Austin Convention Center. Since the device doesn’t hit stores until May, SXSW has become its public debut.
When we joined the Open Compute Project as a founding member nearly two years ago, we made the promise to work closely with partners to deliver data center solutions built on open standards.
Much like the big guy makes a list and checks it twice, we want to give you strategies to prepare your server configuration for the holiday traffic this year. An important thing to do to ensure that you are on your customers’ “Nice” list is to tune and test your cloud configuration.
There are some in the hardware community that question the value of the Open Compute Project and believe that it represents a “race to the bottom” from a hardware design standpoint. These people seem to feel that any distinctive, interesting or innovative design principles will be pushed away due to competitive risks favoring something that solves for only the most basic or rudimentary requirements. I completely disagree with this sentiment.
Open-sourced hardware is hard. Open sourced software is more accessible for people to contribute to: a person can go grab the software out of the repository and work on it at night or the weekend and then run the commits up. There is a different kind of commitment to produce a something that is a physical resource or a device. It is sometimes confusing how people can get involved to shape this environment; however, it is fundamentally important for people’s voices to be heard.
Here at Rackspace we view OpenStack as the operating system of the cloud. We believe that the openness and large community that has developed around OpenStack provides value for consumers by empowering them with flexibility and optimization options. Consumers can use OpenStack to power an on premise cloud or a cloud hosted by a provider.
The momentum OpenStack Summit San Diego built up on day one continued through day two with other key OpenStack announcements and presentations.
The Open Compute Project is working hard to generate and develop a leadership stance on environmental stewardship. Facebook, one of the founders of Open Compute, has made significant accomplishments by establishing industry leading Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) metrics (the ratio of the power delivered to a facility that is available for servers to consume).
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