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For the last several weeks I’ve been explaining the setup of my home Rackspace Private Cloud and OpenStack lab. From the basic hardware configuration and adding compute nodes to adding high availability and using Neutron networking.
Getting an application designed, tested and running, then updating and improving it is no easy task — even in the best of times. There is a continuing quest for tooling that delivers automation of this work to allow more focus on what matters most: fast, efficient development. This automation is increasingly sought via a platform service layer that abstracts the compute, networking and storage details of the infrastructure service layer — offering simplification for application developers and the cloud operators who support them.
Adding Extra Compute Nodes to Rackspace Private Cloud
Rackspace Cloud Deployment Services give you the ability to easily deploy applications and frameworks to the Rackspace Open Cloud. This lets you focus on code instead of architecting and deploying separate production, staging and development environments.
Unstructured data—information without a predefined data model—is expected to swell to four times the amount of structured data by 2020. This growth has made the NoSQL datastore ecosystem thrive, because NoSQL is ideal model for tackling unstructured data.
So after following the first three posts, we now have a Rackspace Private Cloud powered by OpenStack running with two Controllers (HA) and three Computes. So now what? Well the first thing we need to do is get our hands dirty with the OpenStack Networking component, Neutron, and create a network that our instances can be spun up on. For the home lab, I have dumb unmanaged switches – and I take advantage of that by creating a Flat Network that allows my instances access out through my home LAN on the 192.168.1.0/24 subnet.
How is Rackspace different? It’s a question that I get all the time.
When we started OpenStack, the goal was to form a community of like-minded companies and contributors to push for an open alternative to proprietary cloud software. We saw open source as a platform to foster swift innovation and to give customers more choice.
In the first two posts I covered the basics: what hardware is involved and the basic network services that form the basis of my Rackspace Private Cloud install. In this post, I set up Rackspace Private Cloud to give an OpenStack environment consisting of highly available Controllers running as a pair with services such as the OpenStack APIs, Neutron, Glance and Keystone and three compute servers allowing me flexibility to do some testing.
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